The Intercept

The Intercept Condemns Brazilian Criminal Complaint Against Glenn Greenwald as an Attack on Free Press

The Intercept

Photo: Ariel Zambelich/The Intercept

On Tuesday, a federal prosecutor in Brazil announced a denunciation of American journalist and Intercept co-founder Glenn Greenwald related to his work on a series of stories published on The Intercept and The Intercept Brasil. The denunciation is a criminal complaint that would open the door to further judicial proceedings. It alleges that Greenwald “directly assisted, encouraged and guided” individuals who reportedly obtained access to online chats used by prosecutors and others involved in Operation Car Wash, a yearslong, sprawling anti-corruption investigation that roiled Brazilian politics.

The denunciation will now go before a judge who can approve or deny the request for charges.

The Intercept and Greenwald both released statements Tuesday decrying the federal prosecutor’s accusation as an attack on Brazil’s free press in line with recent abuses by the government of far-right President Jair Bolsonaro. Abuses committed by Justice Minister Sergio Moro when he served as the presiding judge in Operation Car Wash were central to The Intercept’s reporting in the Brazil Secret Archive series.

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WIRED

This Apple-FBI Fight Is Different From the Last One

WIRED

Photograph: Tom Brenner/Reuters

This all might sound familiar: After a mass shooting, the Federal Bureau of Investigation wants Apple to build a tool that can unlock the attacker’s iPhones. But don’t expect round two of Apple versus the FBI to necessarily play out like the first. The broad outlines are the same, but the details have shifted precariously.

For all the FBI’s posturing, its attempt to force Apple to unlock the phone of one of the San Bernardino terrorists ultimately ended in a draw in 2016. The FBI dropped its lawsuit after the agency found a third-party firm to crack it for them. Now, the FBI claims that only Apple can circumvent the encryption protections on the two recovered iPhones of Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, who killed three people and wounded eight in December at a naval air station in Pensacola, Florida. As it did four years ago, Apple has declined.

Apple’s central argument against helping the FBI in this way remains the same: creating a backdoor for the government also creates one for hackers and bad actors. It makes all iPhones less safe, full stop. Since the last Apple-FBI showdown, though, technological capabilities on both sides, the US political landscape, and global pressures have all substantially evolved.

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EFF

Top Apps Invade User Privacy By Collecting and Sharing Personal Data, New Report Finds

Electronic Frontier Foundation

A new year often starts with good resolutions. Some resolve to change a certain habit, others resolve to abandon an undesired trait. Mobile app makers, too, claim to have user behavior and their preferences at their heart. From dating to health to music, their promise is to add convenience to consumers’ lives or to offer support when needed. The bad news is that the ecosystem of the underlying ad tech industry has not changed and still does not respect user privacy. A new report published today by the Norwegian Consumer Council (NCC) looks at the hidden side of the data economy and its findings are alarming.

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Cybersecurity Insiders

How to secure a router from Cyber Attacks

Cybersecurity Insiders

Hackers nowadays are seen using routers as botnets to launch cyber attacks on large companies and organizations. So, in such circumstances, here are some steps that will help secure a router from cyber attacks.

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Miscellanious

Update Firefox now!

Within just a few days after the release of Firefox 72 an update to patch a zero-day vulnerability is available. You find more info about CVE-2019-17026 here.

Update to 72.0.1 now!

Cybersecurity Insiders

Ransomware attack makes US Company employees lose jobs

Cybersecurity Insiders

All these days we have seen malware stealing data and locking down data access for a ransom. Now, here’s a piece of different news that might grab your attention.

A company that was operating in the United States for 60 years was cyber-attacked in October last year, making the head of the company urged over 300 employees to leave their jobs and look for alternatives just before the Christmas 2019 holidays.

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Naked Security

Don’t fall for the “Start your 2020 with a gift from us” scam…

Naked Security

Have you ever received items by courier from people overseas?

If so, you’ll know that sometimes – notably in the case of gifts, where the other person hasn’t told you what they’re sending – the courier company doesn’t deliver the item directly.

Sometimes you get an email saying that the item is delayed because the authorities want to inspect it; or there’s import duty; or there’s a supplementary delivery charge if you can’t collect it from the depot yourself.

And to help you get through the paperwork easily, there’s often a tracking code and a clickable link in the email.

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WIRED

Russia Takes a Big Step Toward Internet Isolation

WIRED

Photograph: Alexander Nemenov/Getty Images

Over the holidays, the Russian government said it had completed a multi-day test of a national, internal internet known as RuNet, a bid to show that the country’s online infrastructure could survive even if disconnected from the rest of the world. Though Russia claims the initiative relates to cybersecurity, researchers and human rights advocates inside Russia and around the world argue that the test underscores Russia’s broader campaign to control and censor access to digital information within its borders.

….

The government is also investing 2 billion rubles — about $32 million — in a Russian Wikipedia alternative.

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Our conclusion

This is a very tedious and disturbing development, especially for the Russian people!