Please stop leaking your own personal data online, Indonesia’s COVID-19 taskforce tells citizens

The Register

Indonesian officials have asked its nation’s citizens to stop leaking their own personal data on social media by sharing pictures of certificates attesting to their receipt of COVID-19 vaccinations.

In a Tuesday press conference, Indonesia’s COVID-19 task force spokesman Wiku Adisasmito explained that the certificates include a QR code that, when scanned, can yield personal medical data.

Adisasmito explained the possible consequences of data leakage at a Tuesday press conference.

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Teenage Twitter hijacker gets three years in the clink over celeb Bitcoin scamming

The Register

Graham Ivan Clark, part of the crew that hijacked around 130 high-profile Twitter accounts and used them to collect cryptocurrency, has been sentenced to three years in prison for his part in the scam.

On July 15 last year around 130 Twitter accounts from celebs like Bill Gates, Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Apple, Uber, and former president Barack Obama began displaying messages asking for Bitcoin to be sent to a wallet, whereupon the amount would be doubled and returned. Amazingly, enough people fell for this and around $118,000 was transferred.

Of course, there was no free money, and after he was caught just days later, and following some time in detention, Clark gave up all the funds and pleaded guilty to Judge Christine Marlewski in a Florida court. In addition to his sentence he’s required to hand over passwords to any account he may have online and will have three years’ probation after serving his time.

Fellow Florida local Nima Fazeli has also been charged with the Twitter incident, as has Brit Mason Sheppard, and the authorities are working with British police on that one, not entirely successfully.

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Swiss security provocateur who leaked Intel secrets indicted by US authorities

The Register

The US Department of Justice says a grand jury has indicted Swiss security provocateur Till Kottmann over multiple exploits and attempts at fraud, and authorities have quickly moved to rule out free speech as a defence.

Readers may remember Kottman pointed out holes in a security skills assessment website run by Deloitte, dropped 20GB of Intel secrets onto the web and shamed the security of DevOps tool SonarQube by releasing third-party code created with the project. Kottman’s name was also linked to the mass p0wnage of video camera outfit Verkada.

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Was 2020 a year of lost innovation? Not for cybercriminals

The Register

The shift to remote working over the last year hasn’t been all bad – it’s forced the pace of digital transformation and encouraged many organisations to rethink the way they operate.

Unfortunately, that’s as true of the cybercriminal fraternity as anyone else. Even as workforces retreated to their homes, malefactors seized on the vulnerability of endpoints outside the corporate network, as Malwarebytes’ 2021 State of Malware Report showed.

At the same time, major breaches at Twitter and Solarwinds, showed even the most (theoretically) sophisticated organisations were vulnerable to determined and highly skilled cyber-spies.

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Supermicro spy chips, the sequel: It really, really happened, and with bad BIOS and more, insists Bloomberg

The Register

Following up on a disputed 2018 claim in its BusinessWeek publication that tiny spy chips were found on Supermicro server motherboards in 2015, Bloomberg on Friday doubled down by asserting that Supermicro’s products were targeted by Chinese operatives for over a decade, that US intelligence officials have been aware of this, and that authorities kept this information quiet while crafting defenses in order to study the attack.

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No joy for Julian Assange as Uncle Sam confirms it will keep pushing for WikiLeaker’s extradition to America

The Register

The US Dept of Justice will continue pushing for the extradition of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, a spokesperson confirmed on Wednesday.

This comes after a UK judge blocked Assange’s shipment to the States on mental health grounds last month. As a result, the US government faced a deadline of the end of this week to challenge the ruling. Today’s announcement makes it plain that the decision will be challenged.

That deadline represented just the latest in a long series of possible resolution points for the case against the hacker and online publisher of leaked documents, the previous one being the exit of President Trump from the White House with some expecting him to pardon Assange on the way out the door. He decided not to in the end.

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Tiny Kobalos malware seen backdooring SSH tools, menacing supercomputers, an ISP, and more – ESET

The Register

ESET researchers say they have found a lightweight strain of malware that targets multiple OSes and has hit supercomputers, an ISP, and other organisations.

Nicknamed Kobalos, the software nasty is said to be portable to Linux, the BSDs, Solaris, and possibly AIX and Windows. ESET researchers Marc-Etienne M.Léveillé and Ignacio Sanmillan appear to have analysed primarily the Linux version of the code.

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Countless emails wrongly blocked as spam after Cisco’s SpamCop failed to renew domain name at the weekend

The Register

Cisco’s anti-spam service SpamCop failed to renew spamcop.net over weekend, causing it to lapse, which resulted in countless messages being falsely labeled and rejected as spam around the world.

From what we can tell, this is what happened. When the domain name expired, *.spamcop.net resolved to a domain parking service’s IP address. The way that SpamCop’s DNS-based blocking list works is that if you, for example, want to check that an email sent from a system with the IP address 1.2.3.4 is legit, you run a DNS query on 4.3.2.1.bl.spamcop.net. If SpamCop returns a valid DNS entry for that lookup, then it’s an IP address known to have sent out spam in the past and should be treated with suspicion.

Thus, after the domain name expired, every single *.bl.spamcop.net lookup would succeed, as it’s pointing to a parking service, meaning every email received by a server checking SpamCop for known spammers would be flagged up as spam and rejected. As such, mail server administrators saw what looked like a deluge of spam.

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