New Release: Tor Browser 10.0.15

Tor Project

Tor Browser 10.0.15 is now available from the Tor Browser download page and also from our distribution directory.

This version updates Openssl to 1.1.1k. In addition, Tor Browser 10.0.15 includes a bugfix for when Javascript is disabled on websites.

Relay operators who use the Windows Expert Bundle are strongly encouraged to upgrade their relay.

Note: Android Tor Browser will be available in the coming days.

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Anonymous GitLab Ticketing: An Exciting New Project at Tor

Tor Project

Hi! My name is Maria Violante, and I’m one of two Outreachy interns for Tor Project for Winter 2020/2021. I’m thrilled to share with you the results of my internship thus far: the Anonymous Ticket Portal, which allows individuals to submit instant, anonymous tickets to participate in GitLab repos without signing up for a GitLab account or disclosing any personal data.

Keep reading to find out how you can participate in and benefit from the Anonymous Ticket Portal!

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The State of IPv6 support on the Tor network

Tor Project

In our last article, published in RIPE’s website, we described the work that happened in 2020 related to giving IPv6 support to the Tor network.

Tor 0.4.5.1-alpha is the first release that includes all the work described in the RIPE article. Relays running 0.4.5.1-alpha are the first to report IPv6 bandwidth statistics.

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New Release: Tor Browser 10.0.8

Tor Project

Tor Browser 10.0.8 is now available from the Tor Browser download page and also from our distribution directory.

This release updates Firefox for desktops to 78.6.1esr and Firefox for Android to 84.1.4. This version resolves instability on Apple macOS devices with the new M1 processor.

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New Release: Tor Browser 10.0.7

Tor Project

Tor Browser 10.0.7 is now available from the Tor Browser download page and also from our distribution directory.

This release updates Firefox for desktops to 78.6.0esr and Firefox for Android to 84.1.0. This release includes important security updates to Firefox for Desktop, and similar important security updates to Firefox for Android.

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Use A Mask, Use Tor: Resist the Surveillance Pandemic

Tor Project

As many friends and followers of Tor know by now, we spend the final weeks of each year asking for your help as part of our year-end fundraising campaign. This year hasn’t been a normal year at all, not for Tor and not for the rest of the world. 

In many ways, 2020 has put the dangers of a centralized, surveillance-driven internet into even clearer focus. The pandemic has changed most of our lives dramatically. Many of us have shifted more of our work, socialization, shopping, medical care, and schooling online. We’ve seen governments and corporations roll out new surveillance technology, like tools to watch students while they take tests, tech to spy on workers, and contact tracing mechanisms that will change our world long after the pandemic is over.

In the face of this widespread hardship, people all around the world have also demonstrated enormous gestures of solidarity and mutual-aid, and millions of people have risen in defense of Black lives in the U.S. and around the world.

For our 2020 campaign, we wanted a theme that conveys a positive message and speaks to the power of this kind of community action. That’s why we decided on the theme Use a Mask, Use Tor. There is a lot of meaning and intention behind this slogan. Use a mask, use Tor promotes the positive steps we can all take to combat the virus by using masks. Wearing a mask protects others. Wearing a mask is about caring about each other, our community.

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Join the Tor Localization Hackathon November 6 – 9

Tor Project

Between November 6 and 9, the Tor Project and Localization Lab will host the first edition of Tor Project’s localization hackathon, the Tor L10n Hackaton. A hackathon is an event where a community hangs out and works together to update, fix, and collaborate on a project. The L10n Hackathon is a totally remote and online event.

In this localization hackathon we’re going to work exclusively on the localization of our latest resource, the Tor Community portal. The Community portal is organized into sections: Training, Outreach, Onion Services, Localization, User Research, and Relay Operations. Each section helps users understand how they can get involved in each of these activities to build and strengthen the community supporting the Tor Project.

Localization of Tor Browser and the Community portal are important. Only a minority of internet users are native or second-language speakers of English, however censorship and surveillance are global challenges that affect us all on a daily basis. Ensuring Tor Browser and Tor resources are available in as many languages as possible removes a large barrier to access for those in need of a more secure, anonymous online presence and those who would like to contribute to Tor Project. Tor Browser is currently available to download in 28 languages, and our main website can be read in 11 languages. To support users and build community in all of these languages, it’s important to also have the Tor website, Support portal and Community portal localized.

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Tor Browser and Onion Services – Challenges and Opportunities

Tor Project

Maintaining a browser like Tor Browser has its challenges but also its rewards. It allows us to reach faster adoption of important technologies like onion services, providing a more secure browsing experience for all Tor users. Improving the treatment of onion services on the browser side, however, comes with its own challenges both for users and service providers and it is important to reflect on those as a requirement for future growth. Thus, we feel it is time to take stock in this blog post and outline the steps we have taken over the years to improve the user experience and adoption of onion services, the challenges we faced and continue to face, and what the future might look like.

What does this mean and how did we get here?

Onions services are self-authenticating and provide integrity and confidentiality by default. That means once you are connected to an onion service you can be sure you are talking to the one you tried to reach and your data is not manipulated or read by Man-In-The-Middle-attackers. HTTPS was introduced over 20 years ago to provide some of those properties for plain web traffic (HTTP) when communicating with a server.

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